Dating couble site

Posted by / 27-Aug-2017 10:37

Dating couble site

In the early settlements, poor families ate from trenchers filled from a common stew pot, with a bowl of coars salt the only table adornment.

The earliest trenchers in America, as in the Middle Ages, were probably made from slabs of stale bread which were either eaten with the meal or thrown after use to the domestic animals.

Even the gentry might eat modestly in the morning, although they could afford meat or fish...

Dinner, as elsewhere in the colonies, was a midday, through the wealthy were like to do as their peers in England did, and have it midafternoon..England's gentry had a great variety of food on te table...

The first course included several meats plus meat puddings and/or deep meat pies containing fruits and spices, pancakes and fritters, and the ever-present side dishes of sauces, pickles and catsups...

Soups seem to have been served before of in conjunction with the first course. An assortment of fresh, cooked, or dried fruits, custards, tarts and sweetmeats was usually available.

In frontier outposts and on farms, families drank cider or beer and gulped down a bowl of porridge that had been cooking slowly all night over the embers...

In 1728 the Boston News Letter estimates the food needs of a middle-class 'genteel' family. Dinner consisted of pudding, followed by bread, meat, roots, pickles, vinegar, salt and cheese. Each famly also needed raisins, currants, suet, flour, eggs, cranberries, apples, and, where there were children, food for 'intermeal eatings.' Small beer was the beverage, and molasses for brewing and flavoring was needed.

Butter, spices, sugar, and sweetmeats were luxuries, as were coffee, tea, chocolate, and alcoholic beverages other than beer." ---A History of Food and Drink in America, Richard J.

"Sallats," (salads) though more popular at supper, sometimes were served at dinner and occasionally provided decoration in the center of the table...

Cakes were of many varieties: pound, gingerbread, spice and cheese." ---A Cooking Legacy (p. What is there to say about a meal that probably did not even exist for many settlers during the eary days of the Colonies and later seemed more like a bedtime snack made up of leftovers? In the eighteenth century supper was a brief meal and, especially in the South, light and late.

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Throughout the seventeenth century and well into the eighteenth century it was served in the "hall" or "common room." ..